This page covers the hiking gear I used on the thru-hiking triple crown (Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail, and Continental Divide Trail).  I cover everything from the shoes on my feet, to the pack on my back, and everything in between.

When I started hiking I was like most people, I didn’t have a clue. As a result, I made most of the classic backpacking/hiking rookie mistakes.  Things like the wrong clothes and too many, thinking I needed more than I did, forgetting basic items and more.  Throughout my hiking triple crown and thousands of miles of hiking I learned a lot, but also gained what I call “Trail Confidence“.  It’s what allows one to take less, go further, see more and feel safe doing it.

Finally, it’s important to recognize that how you approach selecting your gear, which gear you bring and how it’s packed and used on trail is the same for an overnight hike, to a multi-day thru-hike like the Appalachian Trail.  Furthermore, most of the gear is the same gear you’d take bikepacking.  Checkout my page on bikepacking gear, or scroll down to continue with the hiking gear.

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1

Pack

2

Shelter

3

Sleep System

4

Clothing

5

Hydration/Cooking

6

Health/First Aid

7

Odds/Ends

8

Electronics

PACK

Due to the fact I was a newbie, I bought a big backpack and of course filled it and then some, for my first thru-hike.  With that said I did have the idea I wanted to keep the weight down.  I simply didn’t know how yet.

The Appalachian Trail was a crash course in of itself on hiking.  Consequently I learned so much and as you’ll see in this Pack section and the other throughout my gear choices changed drastically and I took less.

Like with my bicycle during my bikepacking triple crown, where I gave him a name (Phillip The Trail Donkey), I also named my pack.  All my packs had the same name, Bessy. YES, I talked to them daily and we were/are the best of friends .

Packs outside Pie Town Cafe - Pie Town, New Mexico - hiking gear

PACK SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

  • Pack – Arcteryx Bora 65

Base weight:  25 +/-  lbs

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

  • Pack – ULA Catalyst

Base weight:  13-14 lbs.

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

Base weight:  11-13 lbs.

PACK DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRAILS

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

The Appalachian Trail (AT) was my ground zero if you will.  Consequently, I was super happy with my choice, as I didn’t know any better.  In 2001 when I thru-hiked the AT most people had similar packs and Ultralite (UL) hiking hadn’t gone mainstream.

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

By 2007 I had refined my hiking gear choices, and as a result my pack and what I carried were much different.  After the AT I did the Long Trail in Vermont and went UL.  Most noteworthy from that trip I learned what my limits were on comfort and applied that to my PCT hiking gear set up.

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL 

In 2015 when I thru-hiked the Continental Divide Trail (CDT) I would have liked to be even lighter than the PCT, but I didn’t mentally feel like I wanted to give up what I “thought” I needed.  I did end up using the same pack for part of the CDT that I did the whole PCT on, but I also used a Gossamer Gear Mariposa.

PROS:

  • Comfort – AT
  • Access to gear – PCT & CDT
  • Durability 

For the most part I was happy with all my choices.  I had the space needed for my choice of hiking gear and felt each pack carried the weight well.

CONS:

  • Squeaking 
  • Torn straps

The Mariposa had a annoying squeak in the shoulder strap.  While on the PCT both my load lifter straps almost tore off.  Consequently, both issues were a result of over loading the packs past their maximum load rating.

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Nothing

I’m happy to say none of my choices didn’t work and they met all my needs during my three trails.

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

If I thru-hiked any of the three trails again I would most likely go lighter and take a small pack

  • Go UL (Palante Packs Simple Pack or a Gossamer Gear Kumo)
  • Possibly use a hip pack

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Your pack is the foundation of your complete hike gear set up. It determines how much you can carry and really defines what type of hiker you are.  For me I’m always wanting to see more and go further, so as a result my packs get smaller.

TIPS:

  • No matter what size pack you get, you WILL fill it.  If you want to carry less, start small.
  • It’s easier to change out your gear in pack verse changing out your pack (without changing the gear) while on the trail.  Choose wisely.
  • Trash bags are cheaper and work better than pack covers.
HIKING GEAR
Craig Fowler - PCT-finish - cutting pack weight
Craig Fowler - CDT - Bob Marshall Wilderness - cutting pack weight - hiking gear

SHELTER

Starting my triple crown with the AT, I became a “Shelter Rat”. A Shelter Rat is someone who only hikes from shelter to shelter, only putting up their tent when absolutely necessary.  As a result, I only tented 16 times in 152 nights.

Since the AT I have learned the benefits of using one’s tent.  My tent is my castle and I like full coverage, ease of set up, and for it to be as light as possible.  My last two tents have been from Zpacks and I’ve concluded that if I could, I would combine feature from them both for my perfect shelter.

Zpacks Hexamid Solo Plus - CDT - New Mexico - apache National Forest - hiking gear

SHELTER SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

  • Tent – Sierra Designs UL Clip Flashlight w/ Ground sheet

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

SHELTER SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRAILS

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

I chose the Clip Flashlight due to it’s minimal weight at the time.

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

By the time I got the PCT I was past double wall tents and ease of set up was a big factor for me.  Most of all, I knew I would be spending much more time in my tent than I did while on the AT.

I started the PCT with a tarp, due to a hold I put in my tent on the bike ride to the start.  The tarp was tough to master at first and I had my reservations, but in the end I felt worked well.  The Contrail by Tarp Tent was probably my favorite tent of all.  I wish it came in cuben fiber.

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

Just like with the PCT, I started with my tarp.  This time due to a delay in production of my tent.  The Zpacks Solo Plus tent was super roomy, was easy to put up but really tricky to get set up properly.  I made the switch from the Tarp Tent because I wanted the advantages the cuben fiber (doesn’t stretch with moisture).

PROS:

  • Lighter than most – Solo Plus
  • Simplistic
  • Versatility – Tarp
  • Ease of set up – Contrail

Most of all I was happy with my choices.  The pros out weighted the cons but none of them were perfect, if that even exists.  My needs change from trail to trail so perfect is matching tent to trail I guess.

CONS:

  • Protection from wind – Tarp
  • Set up tough to get right – Solo Plus
  • Large foot print – Solo Plus
  • Sagged in rain – Contrail

As I said above the Cons weren’t anything I couldn’t deal with or over come while on the trail.  

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Nothing

All my set ups worked well.  When I did face adverse conditions extra care had to be taken but they were’t unmanageable.

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

If I hike any of the three trails again I would do the following:

  • Possibly make a homemade tent out of cuben fiber that met my personal needs for that trail.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

As far as hiking gear decision go, picking the right shelter is quite important.  Do your research and pick the set up that makes you feel the most comfortable.  My tent is my safe place while hiking or bikepacking so it’s go to meet my personal needs to give me a comfortable and enjoying nights sleep.

TIPS:

  • Really know what your comfortable with in terms of sleeping (Cowboy Camping, Partial or Full protection)
  • Easier to say than to do, but don’t let price dictate your buying decision.
  • Tarp users should learn multiple ways to pitch their tarp depending on weather conditions.

SLEEP SYSTEM

Down, Down , Down!  I love down.  A common thought with most new hikers is that down is bad and it’s only a matter of time before you get it wet and freeze to death.  The reality is much less grim.  I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have a few nights of wetness during my triple crown.  If you take a few simple precautions using a down bag is not a problem.  

The other part of your sleep system is surrounded by myths too.  Sleeping pads don’t need to be thick to be comfortable.  A simple closed cell foam pad combined with a soft surface is just as comfortable as a 3″ air pad, and much lighter.

enigma quilt by Enlightened Equipment - bikepacking gear - hiking gear

SLEEP SYSTEM SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

  • Pad – Thermarest Guide Lite
  • Sleeping Bag – Feathered Friends Raven 10 degree
  • Sleeping Bag – Marmot Arroyoro 30 Degree

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

SLEEP SYSTEM SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRAILS

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

I went for comfort on the AT when I chose my pad.  With no real experience I didn’t really consider other options.  Starting with a 10 degree was a must as I started Feb. 28th.

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL & CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

For the PCT and CDT I went with a closed cell pad for two reasons.  The first being I didn’t want to deal with repairing a self inflating pad, and secondly, I like the ease of use.  For me blowing up and then folding up a self inflating pad is a pain in the ass.  I also sleep just as good on my Z-Lite.

As far as sleeping bags are concerned I found my sweet spot or temperature to be a 20 degree bag.

PROS:

  • Small & packable
  • Weight
  • Versatility – Z-Lite

I liked the ease of use of the Z-Lite Sol over the Guide Lite.  The warmth to weight ratio and packability of the down over synthetic is always a winner in my book. 

CONS:

  • Extra caution to keep down dry.
  • Price
  • Packability – Z-Lite

None of the Cons were anything that I can’t live with.  Keeping my down has never been a problem and fortunately for me I don’t let price stand in the way.  

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Nothing

Everything I choose for each trail worked well.  Each had it’s pros and  cons as stated above but none were horrible choices.  

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

If I thru-hiked any of the three trails again I wouldn’t do much differently.

  • I would carry the Z-Lite Sol pad on all three.
  • Bring the a quilt on all trails.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

All my set ups were good choices.  Sleep is very important during events like these so be sure your sleep system actually works.  You can’t hike all day, day after day without proper rest.

TIPS:

  • The wood decks of the AT’s shelters can be hard and unforgiving.  I would suggest a 3/4 NeoAir.
  • Put you pack under your feet if they get cold on the deck or ground.
  • If your down sleeping bag isn’t new before you go, be sure to wash it so it’s performing at it’s maximum.

CLOTHING

Like all gear, clothing is different from person to person.  Most of the basics are the same but we all have little differences in our kit.  Most of my changes to my kit were to things I wore day to day, and not my camp clothes.  

My goals were to be warm and dry if the situation called for it.  It took some work but I figured out the right set up.  It only took about 4000 miles.

Craig Fowler - Thru-hiking - CDT - Arapaho National Forest- James Peak - hiking hear

CLOTHING SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

WORN

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

WORN

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

WORN

Transition Pieces

  • Rain Jacket – Marmot Precip
  • Rain Pants – Mountain Hardwear Full Zip
  • Gloves – TNF Fleece
  • Gloves – Polypro Liners
  • Top – TNF 100 wt. Fleece Pullover
  • Bottom – Mountain Hardwear Pack Pant

Transition Pieces

Transition Pieces

  • Rain Jacket – Montbell Versalite
  • Rain Pants – Montbell Versalite
  • Gloves – Ibex Knitty Gritty
  • Gloves- Outdoor Research Rain Mitts
  • Top – Pearl Izumi Wind Jacket
  • Headnet – SimBLISSity Ultralite Mosquito

Camp Clothes

Camp Clothes

  • Jacket – Montbell UL Down
  • Hat -Ibex Beanie
  • Socks – Features Crew (2pr)
  • Shoes – Crocs
  • Sleep Top – Ibex Woolies 1 L/S Crew
  • Sleep Bottom – Ibex Woolies Boxer Briefs

Camp Clothes

  • Jacket – Montbell UL Down
  • Hat – Ibex Beanie
  • Socks – Ibex 1/4 Crew (2pr)
  • Shoes – Crocs (Until I lost one)
  • Sleep Top – Ibex Woolies 1 L/S Crew
  • Sleep Bottom – Ibex Woolies Boxer Briefs

CLOTHING SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRAILS

TOUR DIVIDE

On the Tour Divide I didn’t have enough clothes.  I didn’t bring a vest and had to order the windproof gloves mid race.  As far as kits went it was okay.  With only one bib and jersey I stunk pretty bad.

COLORADO TRAIL 

After learning my lesson on the TD of not having enough clothes I added a vest, baggies to put over my bibs and switched out my jersey choice.  I got tired of the sun sleeves being so tight on my arms and they were so dingy.  The loose fitting Astroman was awesome.  Can you say four way stretch?   I also went with the X-Alps for more comfort when doing HABs.

ARIZONA TRAIL 

By the time I rode the AZT my Brooks B17 was so comfortable I said screw bibs.  The idea of sweating that much in the Arizona desert day after day with only one pair of bibs didn’t sit will with me or my ass.  My X-Alps were a little too loose in the heel so again I switched shoes to some Giros.  I also added a visor for hiking the Grand Canyon.

PROS:

  • Options
  • Take less = Less weight

With the selection of clothes I had in my kit I had a pretty flexible kit that was well suited for most conditions I faced during my bikepacking triple crown.  Less meant more room for other items and helped to keep the weight down.

CONS:

  • One kit = STINKY
  • Tightness of the lycra kit got old. – Tour Divide
  • No vest and cold weather gloves to start – Tour Divide

The above says it all.  You’re going to smell.  No, seriously you will stink worse than you ever imagined possible.  Wearing only lycra get’s old fast.  

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Skimping on what I brought to save weight.

Not taking a vest and warmer gloves on the Tour Divide was a mistake.  Bring what you think you’ll need to be comfortable in a wide range of conditions.

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

  • Bring a vest and glove weather gloves to the start of the Tour Divide
  • Attempt to go without bibs on the Colorado Trail.
  • Possibly bring shoes covers – Tour Divide/CTR.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

I really liked riding without lycra on the Arizona Trail.  Wearing baggies was just more comfortable for the long haul.  Make sure you’re both physically and mentally comfortable with your kit.  Not being so could cost you more than not getting to the finish.

TIPS:

  • Bring more, you can always get rid of something, easier than find what your missing.
  • If you’re doing the CTR or AZTR make sure your shoes fit great, both pedaling and hiking. Your feet will swell up, be sure your shoes aren’t too tight in the toe box.
  • The weather could possibly be worse than your imagination thinks, keep this in mind when putting your kit together.  Staying warm  and dry can be very hard when bikepacking.
  • A buff is the one thing everyone should bikepack with!

HYDRATION/COOKING

A solid well put together Tool/Repair Kit should mirror who it belongs too and where they are going.  Every kit will be different for each situation.  Your judgement is better than someone else’s.

I put together my Tools/Repair kit by sitting down with my bike and I looked it over from back to front and top to bottom.  I asked myself what could go wrong, if I could fix it with my mechanical skills, then I made sure I had the tools or parts to fix it.

Camp Cooking on the PCT - hiking gear

HYDRATION/COOKING SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

HYDRATION

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

HYDRATION

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

HYDRATION

COOKING

CLEAN UP

  • Bandana
  • Lighter
  • Sponage
  • Soap

COOKING

CLEAN UP

  • Bandana
  • Lighter
  • Olive Oil in 16 oz. Gatorade Bottle

COOKING

CLEAN UP

  • Bandana
  • Lighter

HYDRATION/COOKING SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEN TRAILS

TOUR DIVIDE, COLORADO & ARIZONA TRAIL

As I didn’t have to use anything more than my pump and a couple of tubes throughout 4028 miles of bikepacking, I didn’t make any changes to my tool kit.

I also used my multi tool a few times and this taught me a valuable lesson.  I learned this lesson many times.  See the What didn’t work section to the right to find out more.

PROS:

  • Small and compact
  • Wide range of tools

My tool kit was both of the things listed above but it also gave me a feeling of confidence.  It’s more than some would carry but I wanted to ensure my chances of finishing were the best they could be.

CONS:

  • None to mention.

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Park Tool Ibeam

This multi tool is a sub par at best.  Don’t ask why I didn’t replace it after the TD.  It’s short allens couldn’t reach many of the bolts on my bike and they have a tendency to fall apart.

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

  • Find a better multi tool that worked better with my bike.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

I was happy with my Tools/Repair kit.  When making it I sat down with my bike and went from front to back and top to bottom and asked myself what could go wrong and could I repair it.

TIPS:

  • Make sure your multi tool works on ALL bolts on your bike.
  • Know your bike and tools, just like your other gear choices.
  • Cover your bases, be prepared for anything.  You’re on your own!

HEALTH/FIRST AID

During my 8000+ miles of hiking, I’ve learned to be safe or as close to safe as I can when in the woods.  Using prior experiences to judge new situations and approaching them with a level head has allowed me to trim down my Health/First Aid set up to the bare minimum. 

My kit shouldn’t be simply copied to save time.  Everyone’s set up should mirror their own personal experience, skill level, and comfort level.  Know your abilities and what you’re comfortable with or without, then move forward from there when building your own first aid kit.

Adventure Medical Kits - First Aid - bikepacking gear - hiking gear

HEALTH/FIRST AID SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

  • Vision – Glasses & contacts & case / contact fluid
  • First Aid – Adventure Medical . 3 kit
  • Toiletries – Toilet paper & hand sanitizer
  • Pain – Avid
  • Imodium AD
  • Lip Baum
  • Oral – Tooth brush & paste
  • Sun Screen – Neutrogena Ultra Sheer
  • Bug Protection – Deet
  • Feet – Mole Skin

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

  • Vision – Glasses & contacts & case / contact fluid
  • First Aid – Adventure Medical . 3 kit
  • Toiletries – Toilet paper & hand sanitizer
  • Pain – Avid
  • Imodium AD
  • Lip Baum
  • Oral – Tooth brush & paste
  • Sun Screen – Neutrogena Ultra Sheer
  • Bug Protection – Deet

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

  • Vision – Glasses & contacts & case / contact fluid
  • First Aid – Assorted bandaids and wipes
  • Toiletries – Dude Wipes & hand sanitizer
  • Pain – Avid
  • Imodium AD
  • Lip Baum
  • Oral – Tooth brush & paste
  • Sun Screen – Neutrogena Ultra Sheer
  • Bug Protection

HEALTH/FIRST AID SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEN TRAILS

TOUR DIVIDE & COLORADO TRAIL 

My Health/First Aid set up for both these trails were the same.  While on the TD I suffered from achilles pain, so as a result I had a chiropractor friend tape my achilles before I left for the CTR.

ARIZONA TRAIL 

For the AZT I went out and bought some K Tape of my own and added it to my set up.  I never did use it but I was glad to have it, just in case.  My medical issues on the AZT were heat exhaustion and dehydration and those just require fluids.

PROS:

  • Small
  • Compact

The biggest Pro was I barely used my Health/First Aid kit in 4028 miles.

CONS:

  • None 

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Nothing

I only used  my Dude Wipes, tooth paste/brush, contacts, avid and sunscreen.  Everything worked wonderfully.

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

  • Start the Tour Divide with my achilles taped.
  • Bring K Tape for all three.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

My Health/First Aid set up was simple and compact.  Besides the AZT and getting heat stroke I used my head when bikepacking and didn’t need to use my kit much. Don’t skip bringing first aid, most times you’re alone and relaying on others is really shitty.

TIPS:

  • Listen to your body, NOT your ego.
  • Tape achilles.
  • Lower saddle or move cleats backward to alleviate achilles pain.
  • Know how to tape other body parts like knees, shoulders or other parts prone to cycling injuries.

ODDS/ENDS

When it came to keeping hydrated on the trail I wanted easy access to my water and what I thought would be enough capacity for each trail.  As I did each trail I learned which bladders worked best and also the pros and cons of bottles mounted unconventionally on varies spots on your bike.

I did carry a filter and back up water treatment, which I almost never used.  Most stretches between resupply stops are rideable without having to filter or caches are available, (depending on your capacity).  Not finishing because I skimped and contracted Giardia is not an option on any of my adventures. 

Platypus Gravity Works Kit - bikepacking gear - hiking gear

ODDS/ENDS SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

  • Hiking Poles – Leki Ultra Makalus
  • Maps –  ATC paper
  • Bandana
  • MSR Pack Towel
  • Pen and Notebook
  • Film

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

  • Hiking Poles – Pacer Poles
  • Maps – PCTA paper & John Harrison JMT
  • Bandana
  • MSR Pack Towel (1/2)

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

ODDS/ENDS SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRAIL

TOUR DIVIDE 

With long distances between towns I wanted extra capacity.  If I didn’t have to filter that meant less stopping.  I had about 5 liter capacity.

COLORADO TRAIL 

For the Colorado Trail I switch out my Platypus Big Zip LP for a Platypus Hoser Hydration Bladder. I also added a bottle to my down tube (the bottles from the fork were gone).

ARIZONA TRAIL 

Despite being October when I did the AZT I knew I needed to be able to carry lots of water.  I once again switched out the Platypus Hoser for a MSR Dromlite dromedary bag as it fit better in my frame bag.  I added bottles back onto my fork as well.  I had about 5-6 liter capacity.

PROS:

  • Ease of use

I had the water I needed with three different systems that all worked.

CONS:

  • Fit
  • Fork mounts unreliable.
  • Tire clearance

I had fit issue with the Big Zip LP, as the plastic closure didn’t fit between the top and down tubes. The Hoser fit better but it’s shape didn’t use the available space in my frame pack well. The straps that come with most fork mounts are junk and break quickly.  Tire clearance is an issue with downtube bottle mounts and suspension forks.

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • Nothing

All my Hydration set ups worked, but each had it’s short comings.  None were major and I was able to overcome them while on trail. 

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

  • Better research which type of bladder fit the best in my frame bag.
  • Use a more fixed mount for the down tube bottle mount to avoid bouncing and tire rub.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Like with most set ups on this page, I would have benefitted from more testing before toeing the line at the races.  Everything worked well but I did have to over come some flaws along the way that cause unneeded stress while on trail.

TIPS:

  • Check your filters efficiency before leaving.
  • Know how to repair/backwash filter properly.
  • Replace fork mount straps with reinforced ones before you go.

ELECTRONCIS

I tried my best to keep the number of electronics I carried to a minimum but only succeeded some what.  I did choose items that used USB cords (and that were the same size, to further minimize the number of items).  I did this so I could charge anything with my SON generator hub, relaying on my external battery only as a backup.

I found out the hard way that ZipLock bags (and bikepacking bags) are not sufficient at keeping electronics dry. Do yourself a favor and get a waterproof case.

Bikepacking Electronics for the Triple Crown - bikepacking gear - hiking gear

ELECTRONICS SET UP BY TRAIL

APPALACHIAN TRAIL 

  • Headlamp – Petzl Tika
  • Batteries – AA &AAA
  • Camera – Cannon (film)

PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

  • Headlamp – Petzl TakTikka Plus
  • Batteries – AA & AAA lithium
  • Cannon A710 Camera (Digital)
  • Phone – Flip
  • Solar – Solio Solar Charger
  • Journaling – Pocket Mail
  • Music – Zune MP3 Player

CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

  • Headlamp – Petzl Tikka RXP
  • Batteries – AA & AAA Lithium
  • Camera – N/A
  • Phone – Apple iPhone 6+
  • Solar – Power Traveller Solarmonkey Adventure Solar Panel
  • External Battery – Anker 15,000mAh
  • Phone Case – Life Proof Nuud
  • USB Block – Apple & Cord
  • USB Cord – One to fit both Anker and Petzl

ELECTRONICS SET UP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TRAILS

TOUR DIVID & COLORADO TRAIL 

My electronics set up was the same for both the TD and CTR expect I switched out the ZipLocks for a SealLine E-case to protect my electronics.

ARIZONA TRAIL 

On the AZT I switched out my Goal Zero Flip 20 for an Anker external battery.  I did this for two reasons.  The first being that I fried the first one on the TD and the second Flip 20 I had didn’t hold a charge on the CTR.  The second reason was I needed a proven and larger battery for the AZT.

PROS:

  • Versatile
  • Relability

I choose my electronics kit carefully, and made sure cords were interchangeable.

CONS:

  • ZipLocks failed 

Any and all issues I had with my electronics was due to outside factors and not related to the electronics themselves.

WHAT DIDN’T WORK:

  • ZipLocks

As I mentioned in the Bags section above I used ZipLocks to store my electronics on the TD and they failed miserably.  

THINGS I’D DO DIFFERENTLY:

  • Start with storage like a SealLine E-case.
  • Carry a second strap for headlamp so I could use it without having to wear my helmet.  (I zip tied my head lamp to my helmet)

FINAL THOUGHTS:

I mentioned earlier in the Cons section that my issues were from outside factors.  I think with further use before my races I could have eliminated them.  This is yet another example of why I keep saying to TEST your set up!

TIPS:

  • Use electronics that have interchangeable USB cords.
  • Make your system redundant, back ups for back ups.
  • Proper waterproof storage.

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